I care, therefore I am

all about PLUMPY’NUT and only PLUMPY’NUT for the next 48 hours. Here’s the deal:

There are 48 hours left to win charity dollars for Doctors Without Borders and their tireless work to feed those most seriously stricken by the famine this season in Ethiopia. Ethiopia is the country where my son was born to a mother who could not feed him – there wasn’t enough food. I am passionate about this. With 48 hours left….WE NEED YOUR HELP!

Doctors Without Borders, a nobel prize winning organization, is distributing a life saving food to children in Sub-Saharan Africa called Plumpy’Nut – it’s a true lifesaver. $40 provides one full course of 5-6 weeks of nutrition that mom’s can give to the kids without hospitalization. It’s amazing stuff – and it’s being used right now to rescue children from the brink of death. I wish I were being dramatic – I’m not.

I have joined, once again, a team of dedicated friends and an Ironwoman Triathlete, to raise money for Doctors Without Borders as part of the Wisconsin Ironman Triathlon and the Janus Charity Challenge. You can help US take a charity podium finish AND save a child’s life, right now! We need to place in the top 5 for the charity competition to win an additional $2K to $10K for the distribution of Plumpy’Nut. Janus Funds gives this charity award in the race – and our racer is bound and determined to win (not the athletic competition – but the CHARITY competition!).

Here is the link to make a donation: https://www.kintera.org/faf/donorreg/donorpledge.asp?ievent=296288&supID=246858948

Here is a video featured on 60 minutes about Plumpy’Nut: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/10/19/60minutes/main3386661.shtml

I’m appealing to your sense of making Ethiopia a place where women and men don’t need to relinquish their children because of a “temporary” hunger crisis. Please, do what you can. It’s worth your time to save a life today.

*no athlete, no adoption agency, no individual person gains from our work – the kids who NEED THE FOOD get all of your dollars at emergency feeding stations in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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